I Remember When . . . .
Great Stories about growing up in the Horntown, Oklahoma area!

Back
 

Use It Up

     There's an old saying "Use it up, Wear it out, Make it do, Or do Without."
     We practiced that well in the 1940's. Oil prospectors came thru Hughes Co. paying two dollars a hole, to search your property. Now for two dollars you could buy a battery for your car, so Dad let them sink a hole. They did not find oil, but we got a new battery. The old battery was exchanged for a six month subscription of the Capper Weekly News paper, which had recipes, patterns and a continued story to keep you buying the paper. The old papers were used to start a fire in the stoves.
     Grandma had a shoe last. It was a metal leg of sorts, that you could fit a metal piece the size you needed on top. Then with leather and tacks she would resole or repair her shoes. Tacks would work thru and into your feet at times. Finding a hammer to flatten the tip of the tack, would become very necessary. If beyond repair, pieces of leather were used as a hinge or to make a sling shot holder.
     Ladies would make quilts from scraps of any material they had. Old suits of the men in the family were usually wool. When worn beyond repair, the legs were cut off the britches and made into squares or rectangles and sewn together, then (tacked) with yarn. Too tough to quilt, the yarn would be threaded thru the blocks to hold the cotton batting and backing together and tied into knots. Very itchy, but also very warm. The cotton for the batting was home grown, picked and carded to make it flat.
     Grandma had a ball of twine (string) , the size of which was between a soft ball and a basket ball. Every little piece from bags of flour or feed was wound around this ball. She tied each new piece to the end of the old one. Tin foil was saved, made into balls and sold.
     Never saw a rubber band, except for the old cut up inner tubes, which also made sling shots. Dad has a small box of patches that he would heat press onto the old inner tubes. After patch on top of patch, the old tires would go thumping down the road.
     No oils were available. Breads, gravies, pies, or vegetables that were cooked used either butter, bacon drippings or lard rendered from the hogs.
     I remember once the wheel bearings on the Model A went dry, we were on a long trip and no place near to buy grease, Ponds face cream came to the rescue, Dad packed the bearings full and we made it to the next town.
     Egg shells were baked in the oven, crushed and fed back to the chickens. Bent nails were straightened with a hammer and used over and over. Flower petals were dried, put into small bags to make a nice smell in the house.
     We ate wild blackberries, huckleberries, mulberries and picked hickory nuts and black walnuts.
     Scrumptious flavors, still remembered.
Lou Anne Allen, Attended Moss Schools from the 3rd. - 6th. Grades.

Back