I Remember When . . . .
Great Stories about growing up in the Horntown, Oklahoma area!

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Oh, So Many Memories

     I attended Moss from the 3rd thru the 6th grade. Remember Mr. Webber, Mrs. Busey and Mr. Doughty. Classmates, Dorothy Cherry, Clarice Adair, Barbara Leewright, Joan Collins, Johnny Jay, Geneva Shockley, Henry Stelter, Doyle Hardwick and many more. I also remember the coal burning stoves and the smells. A story that was told of some of the older boys, putting skunk oil on the engine of Mr. Webbers new automobile. Every time the engine got hot the smell would gag you.. There were soft ball games on the school grounds and some kind of initiation, that we were told to wear our clothes wrong side out and carry our lunch to school in a pail. Most used an old syrup bucket with a lid.
     We would usually get a new pair of shoes in the fall. During the summer, chopping corn, watermelons, cucumbers or what ever crops were planted, we would go barefoot. Usually get the tops of our feet so sunburned we could not wear shoes, or slicing the end of a big toe with the freshly sharpened hoe.
     We had a pair of red mules, Kit and Kate, so old we had to have their corn ground for them to eat it. We would find wads of grass in the pasture, they could not chew, but a harder working pair you would never find. Dad could not believe what happened one day, he came in telling how he had started home with a wagon load, come to a steep muddy clay hill, and he said those mules actually got on their knees and made it up the hill. We all loved animals dearly and were touched that they were such a great pair. I would slip down to the barn in the evenings and feed all the stock nubbins from the corn crib. Oh, so many memories, we had a barn raising for that barn. Many neighbors came and the men painted the boards with chewing tobacco spit, said it would bring good luck.
     In the winter, the girls (myself included) wore those horrible long cotton stockings, garters and all. I would walk to the bus stop at the Smiths house and sit on the wooden seats in the bus, no springs, to school. As we turned off the road toward Moss, someone had set a trap for coyotes with a dead chicken hanging from a limb of a tree. Guess the trap was covered below the chicken.
     Mr. and Mrs. Fairbanks lived to the north of our place. Carmichaels and House were names of other neighbors. Mrs. Smith's mother lived near the top of a hill to the south, across from my Grandmother Laura Strickland, who lived on our farm.
     Times got tough, my Dad was not able to farm anymore, so we sold the farm and moved to California. Spent the next 50 years there.
Lou Anne Allen, Attended Moss Schools from the 3rd. - 6th. Grades.

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